10+ Costumes That Were Made So Historically Correct, You Can’t Find Any Fault in Them



The history of cinematography contains many movies dedicated 10+ Costumes not to some abstract time period but to certain historical epochs. Such flicks challenge their creators because 10+ Costumes it’s expected that they will be historically accurate, especially when it comes to costumes. If characters’ outfits end up having any small mistakes on them, viewers won’t be able to fully lose themselves in the atmosphere of the time, and they’ll likely leave negative feedback after watching the film.We at Bright Side looked through movies where the costumes weren’t only spectacular but also historically accurate. Also, we wondered what the designers were guided by when they first created the costumes through sketches.

10+ Costumes That Were Made So Historically Correct, You Can’t Find Any Fault in Them
© Emma. / Working Title Films

The Oscar-winning costume designer, Alexandra Byrne, carefully studied archives, vintage patterns, and the fabrics of the Renaissance period to understand what colors, fabrics, and wardrobe items were popular in the 1800s.

Many people mistakenly assume that people used to wear gloomy and 10+ Costumes lackluster clothes during those times. But the rich fashionistas of that period did their best to show off their good taste and status through garments. They preferred rich fabrics and bright colors. That’s why Byrne decided to bust this widespread stereotype and showed a saturated candy palette in her costumes, from tender pinks to bright ocher colors.

10+ Costumes That Were Made So Historically Correct, You Can’t Find Any Fault in Them
© Emma. / Working Title Films, © Chertsey Museum

Byrne also found inspiration in museum exhibits. 10+ Costumes For example, the pale-pink spencer that Emma was wearing was actually a part of the look that Regency-era fashionistas liked. Also, in the 1790s, men were the only ones who’d wear this short blazer, but later it quickly fell on female shoulders too. Spencers helped girls diversify the white dresses they grew tired of wearing, as they were extremely popular in the first quarter of the nineteenth century.

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